Milwaukee Edition

Erase E-Waste

Regift or Recycle Smart Phones

Sunny studio/Shutterstock.com

When replacing holiday purchases of smartphones and other electronic devices, don’t just trash the old ones. Manufacturing electronics consumes many resources and discarded waste can leak harmful chemicals into ecosystems. There are far better ways to redirect and repurpose them.

Besides trading in phones for a rebate, another good option is transferring them to an official recycling program that makes sure all components are dealt with properly. Some states offer special provisions. Check the E-Cycling Central website at eiae.org. Major phone makers and carriers offer recycling programs, and some retailers accept select electronic devices.

Best of all, give a device a new life by gifting it. RecyclingForCharities.com accepts obsolete personal electronic devices by mail; the donor selects a charity to receive the proceeds. ShelterAlliance.net, CellPhonesForSoldiers.com and Phones4Charity.org are kindred organizations.

AmericanCellPhoneDrive.org lets users find nearby charity recycling initiatives via zip code. It provides scholarships for U.S. children that have lost a parent through warfare or terrorism, feeds malnourished children in Asia, builds low-income housing and donates prepaid calling cards to military personnel.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, other unwanted electronic devices can be recycled so that incorporated copper, steel and glass can be recovered and reused. Other materials like lead (in circuit board solder, glass cathode ray tubes of many TVs and computer screens, and batteries) and mercury (in fluorescent backlights of many flat-panel screen displays) can be captured and recycled, instead of polluting the environment.

Small appliances like toasters, coffee makers and clothing irons aren’t considered e-waste and generally aren’t recyclable because they are made of a mix of plastic and metal. Using them for many years helps.


This article appears in the December 2017 issue of Natural Awakenings.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

New Musical Yoga Studio Opening in Shorewood

Sacred Sound Yoga, a unique musical studio opening in October, will hold yoga classes that include sacred sound healing and beautiful original music played by owner Rosie Rain and her friends.

Santosha Yoga & Ayurveda Welcomes Swami Yatidharmananda

In September, Swami Yatidharmananda will travel from India to appear at Santosha Yoga & Ayurveda, in Delafield, to teach his unique practices of mindfulness, meditation and living a spiritual life of devotion.

Enjoy Free Yoga at Rise Yoga Studio’s Open House

Rise Yoga Studio is celebrating one year in Mequon with an open house from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m., September 15.

Experience the Plant-Based Lifestyle at Vegan Sol Food & Drink Expo

The Vegan Sol Food & Drink Expo, an event celebrating all aspects of vegan lifestyles, takes place 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, September 22 at Nicolet High School, in Glendale.

School of Sound and Healing Fall Certification Program

Angel Light Center for the Healing Arts, a resource for health, healing and spiritual development, begins its School of Sound and Healing fall certification program November 2 through 4, in Elm Grove.

Heal the Past and Enjoy Present Happiness Through Mindfulness Workshop

On Wednesdays from October 17 through December 12, psychologist Susan Trafton will lead an eight-week class—Engage the Body, Open the Heart, Heal the Mind—at GreenSquare Integrative Health Care Center from 6:30 to 8 p.m.

Natural Health Services Welcomes New Naturopathic Doctor

Dr. Mary Simon, a naturopathic doctor, is now accepting patients at Natural Health Services, located on Milwaukee’s East Side.

Open the Heart at 
Midwest Yoga and Kirtan Fest

Kirtan—call-and-response chants set to music—began in India centuries ago as a spiritual practice and a layman’s way to connect with the divine.

Letter from Publisher

Natural Awakenings is just one of many publications delivering cutting-edge information about natural, noninvasive, non-pharmaceutical health remedies presented by health and wellness advocates, scientists and researchers.

Dirt Houses Cancer-Protective Microbe

Soil contains bacteria that kills melanoma cancer cells, say Oregon State University researchers.

Doctors Underestimate Opioid Prescriptions

A survey of 109 emergency room doctors found they frequently underestimated how often they prescribed opioids and that they prescribed fewer when alerted to the situation.

Asthma Less Likely to Afflict Breastfed Kids

Dutch children that had been breastfed had a 45 percent lower incidence of asthma later in childhood.

Add your comment: